Cloth Diapering: All That Other Stuff

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Cloth Diapering: All That Other Stuff

I’m not going to talk about cloth diapering today. I’m sure you’re checking the post title and image thinking “but that’s the title of the post!” Well, cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I’m sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already with all of the information that’s out there. I’m going to make it nice and easy for you…

Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

Relax, it’s not that hard.

First time diaperers tend to be so caught up in doing it the right way that they don’t take the time to figure out their way. I have three children. Two wore cloth diapers and one still does. My way of doing things has been completely different with each. One was skinny and so I used prefolds for a tight custom fit. One had sensitive skin, so we switched to bamboo to suck away any extra moisture. One couldn’t care less and had rhino skin, so we used run-of-the-mill AIOs.

So I’m not going to tell you how to cloth diaper your baby. I’m not going to go over all of the cost benefits. We aren’t going to talk about the different styles of cloth diapers such as Pockets, AIOs, Prefolds and Flat Folds (I honestly couldn’t help you on that last one anyways). Today I am going to tell you about the stuff that no one tells you. The things that you don’t discover till you’re knee deep in poopy diapers. The good stuff.

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The Insider Info on Clothing

Baby clothes sold at your average store are not made to fit over fluffy bums. Although super adorable when running around in only a diaper, cloth diapers are hard to fit in clothes. In the beginning it isn’t so bad. Those footie pajamas have a lot of stretch. It’s when they get into wearing miniature people clothes that the problem arises. Baby denim?  Forget about it. To get pants to fit over that bum, the legs are so long you have to roll the cuff. Once you’ve got the cuffs rolled, your baby will look like a harem dancer.

They sell special baby pants for cloth diaperers, but the price tag is insane. Here are some DIY solutions:

Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

You can make cloth diaper pants using old tees.

Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

You can sew some cloth diaper pants from scratch or use existing pants and remove the back seam, adding a panel like these show (that was my go-to method).

Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

You can make quick pants out of upcycled fleece or wool and then not only do you have pants, but they are leak proof too! We used these at night as jammie pants.

The Insider Info on Wipes

So you’re already doing laundry, why not add cloth wipes as well? I am almost embarrassed to admit this, but cloth wipes didn’t even occur to me until #3 arrived. Like you, I searched endlessly for all the information I could get my hands on. You know what worked the best for wipes? Go to a fabric store, grab the cheapest flannel you can get your hands on and make your own. You can serge the edges or turn twice and stitch. It doesn’t need to be fancy. It doesn’t have to be pretty. It doesn’t need bells and whistles. I had fancy, pretty, bells and whistles wipes. They aren’t worth it. Flannel… plain and simple.

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Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

Simple-Sew Flannel Wipes

While we are talking plain and simple, you may be wondering what to put on your wipes. Water. Maybe a tiny bit of baby soap and coconut oil. I was amazed at the sheer number of Wipes Solution recipes that are floating around out there. Do they work? Maybe. But why put more junk on your poor baby’s bum than you need to? Water.

The Insider Info on Swim Diapers

It’s not until you’re ready to hit the beach with babe in arms that you realize that you need swim diapers. Although naked bums in the sand can be cute, it can also be a bit toasty. It’s also playing with fire as you never know what may come out of your cherub’s hind end in a public place. My ridiculously easy solution: Use a pocket diaper, but take the inserts out. I tried using just a cover and found that the PUL (waterproof lining) tends to stick to baby. If you use an actual diaper it will absorb half the lake and hang to your baby’s ankles. A pocket diaper with no insert works beautifully.

If you still need a bit more direction, Midwest Punk Homestead has some great posts on what you need and how to diaper. There is also a great podcast by Pantry Paratus that is worth giving a listen to.

What are some other things that no one told you about on the hundreds of cloth diapering sites? What would you share with someone who is just getting started?

Cloth diapering has been talked about to death online. In fact, if you are considering cloth diapering, I'm sure you are sufficiently overwhelmed already.

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About Jessica Lane

I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

Comments

Cloth Diapering: All That Other Stuff — 6 Comments

  1. We lived out in the country and cloth diapers seemed the more sensible choice no stores close by if I ran out. I also wanted natural fibers against son’s skin. Cloth diapers seemed a better way to stop chaffing, rash. You changed much more often. I hated seeing other babies in the same droopy plastic diaper for hours unchanged just because they were strong plastic. Later we moved into town and with only one laundromat with most machines not working it wasn’t as easy. Cloth also helped ease my angst from tourists who left plastic stinky diapers in our parking lots and back alley’s of our small tourist town. My choice for cotton was mostly out of defense – but glad I did.

    • I’ve cloth diapered while living in the city, with my inlaws, and in home with our own washer and dryer. In my home was certainly the easiest, but it can be done anywhere. Thanks for sharing TJ!

  2. Posts like these almost make me miss cloth diapers! I love those pants solutions. With the Boy we had prefolds, and he was huge to begin with. Almost nothing fit.
    The Pixie was fairly skinny, we had moved on to all-in-ones, and almost everything fit (except baby skinny jeans–seriously, who thinks things like this up? And even people without babies should know better than to gift such a thing!). She mostly wore dresses anyway. 🙂
    This is a really awesome post for people who really want to know what cloth diapering is all about!
    ~ Christine

    • Yeah, I’ve had all spectrums. Chibi was perfectly average. Chico was a tiny preemie and is still a twig. Little Whistler weighs less now at 2 than he did at four months. He topped out at 25lbs at four months and weighs 23 now.

  3. I wish cloth diapers were big when I had my children. Nowadays you can get such cool designs and services that pick up & deliver. Awesome to see mom’s saving the environment and I bet their kids are loving that soft cloth over that nasty plastic.

    • Just between kids they get fancier. My kids are about 6 years apart (at ages 13, 9 and 2) and every time we add to the “stash” they have something new. I do have to say however, that in my experience the new brands are not as durable as the ones that have been around. I’ve got some Fuzzi Bunz and BumGenius diapers that I’ve had for 13 years. I’ve got Charlie Bananas that the elastic is already weak after a year. My Alvas are junk and used for emergencies only (it rained when all the diapers were on the line).

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