Get Garden Savvy

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Do you know where I’m off to today? The Northern New England Home & Garden Show! This is such a fun event and I always come home with more than I probably need. If garden shows are something new to you, check out my tips for success. Following these tips will assure you have as much fun as I always do.

You've come home from the garden show. Now what? Get garden savvy and you'll be excited to start a new garden on your homestead every year.

Know where you want to grow.

If you need ideas for what to plant all your garden show goodies in, check out these unique containers. Or you can make your own galvanized bin planter. These are great for serious gardeners that want to grow a fair amount of food, but have terrible soil.

Whether you get your plants at a garden show, garden center, or you started them in your very own kitchen, transitioning them outside properly is so important. Based on your garden zone, you’ll know when it’s time to start the transition. Remember, cold tolerant plants (like peas and all those leafy greens) can go out a bit before your last frost date, but tender annuals (like tomatoes and peppers) need some protection from unexpected frosts.

Moving Plants Outdoors

When it’s time for your plants to move outdoors, don’t just dig a hole in the garden and plop them in. Think of it like this: You were having a wonderful time in Palm Beach where someone waited on you hand and foot. If you were thirsty, they would bring you a drink. If you were a bit too warm, they’d fan you. It was a pretty stress-free time. Then they go and pull you off your beach chair and drop you into Maine. There’s wind and the temperature is all over the place. What the heck?! 

You may also enjoy  The Theory Behind Back to Eden Gardening

This is how it is for your plants. Let them spend some time making the transition. When they are ready to be full-time outdoor plants, make sure you are transplanting them correctly to avoid further shock. Don’t worry, I’ve got tips for hardening off (aka: transitioning) and transplanting.

You've come home from the garden show. Now what? Get garden savvy and you'll be excited to start a new garden on your homestead every year.

PS: Thank you to all of you that emailed me to share your success with my Gardener’s Hand Cream recipe. I don’t think I’ve ever received so many emails about a post. It felt great to know I had helped. I do my best to reply to every email I get, so if you haven’t heard back from me, you’re on the list.

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I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

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About Jessica Lane

I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

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