Pickled Wild Onions in Honey-Rosemary Brine

As the first wild onions become well established in their usual nooks of our yard, I begin pickling the first batch. Wild onions look and taste much like green garlic but have only slightly plumped bulbs.

The lovely brine gives a wonderful flavor to garlic cloves, sliced shallots, green onions and other vegetables, as well.

This lovely honey-rosemary brine gives a wonderful flavor to not only wild onions, but to garlic cloves, sliced shallots, green onions and other vegetables, as well.

I pickle the root end of each plant, but the greens have a gentle garlicky flavor perfect for salads, pasta, and other dishes so nothing should go to waste. Outer skins can be removed from the bulb with a light pinch.

Honey-Rosemary Brine

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups Wild Onions (cleaned and trimmed to 3″ or height of jar)
  • 1/2 cup Cider Vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Honey
  • 1/4 cup Water
  • 2 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 6 whole Peppercorns
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 sprig Rosemary

Instructions

Place wild onions into a jar. Combine all other ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes. Pour the hot liquid over the onions and tuck the rosemary into the jar. Let cool before sealing.

This lovely honey-rosemary brine gives a wonderful flavor to not only wild onions, but to garlic cloves, sliced shallots, green onions and other vegetables, as well.

Place in the refrigerator for one week before eating.

Remember, you can use this brine for garlic cloves, sliced shallots, green onions and other vegetables, as well.

Other Great Foraged Foods

Wild Greens with Polenta & Chutney Vinaigrette from Little Fall Creek

Fermented Cattail Shoots from Grow Forage Cook Ferment

Spicy Dandelion Greens from Survival at Home

Hedgerow Jelly from Pixie’s Pocket

Meadow & Brown Field Mushrooms from Little Fall Creek

Homemade Black Walnut Liqueur from Homestead Honey

25+ Rose Hip Recipes from Montana Homesteader

Shaggy Mane Mushrooms from Little Fall Creek

This lovely honey-rosemary brine gives a wonderful flavor to not only wild onions, but to garlic cloves, sliced shallots, green onions and other vegetables, as well.

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8 Comments

  1. Does the pickling juice have to be to the top of the jar? The jar Iโ€™m using for this recipe might be too big?

  2. Do you just eat them as is or use them in other dishes? As is, is fine with me but what do you normally do?

  3. Hi! I just stumbled across your site and was wondering, in your opinion how long would you store this and how? Also, have you ever processed this recipe in a boiling water bath for longer term storage?

    1. Jessica Lane says:

      Because of the pickling process it lasts quite a long time. I haven’t tried canning it, so I can’t say how well that would work.

  4. Sharon Lee says:

    I am saving this, printing and using to Pickle some Ramps this spring.
    I love Ramps, and this recipe looks like it would be a good one for them too.
    Thanks for sharing it and I will let you know how it turns our, when they finally come up thru the snow. LOL

    1. Kelly at Little Fall Creek says:

      Very similar to ramps– that will be delicious! Let us all know!

  5. Anne Marie says:

    Yum! So are these actually wild (i.e. foraged) or are they called wild onions (please excuse my ignorance). Either way, they sound delicious ๐Ÿ™‚

    1. Kelly at Little Fall Creek says:

      Hi Anne Marie! Sorry I missed your question! They are a wild (foraged) vegetable, more like garlic than onion but called wild onions. Very tasty. They grow in little clumps.