Hatching Chicken Eggs: Day 21

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What to Expect on Hatch Day & Lessons Learned from Losses

It’s the day we’ve all been waiting for: Hatch Day! For twenty-one days you’ve been peeking and listening. You’ve had chicks on the brain. Now you finally get to see those fluffy faces. So what can you expect?

It's the day you've been counting down to. But do chicks really hatch on day 21? Find out what to expect when hatch day arrives and what may have gone wrong when not all the chicks make it.

First and foremost, 21 days is not definite. Please do not start panicking when day twenty-one comes along and nothing has happened. More harm comes from over-eager hatchers than chicks dying from getting stuck. The chick will decide on its own time-table when it should come.

Pipping, Zipping & Hatching

On hatch day (day 18-25+) or the days leading up to it, the chick will peck until it breaks through the inner membrane (the part that separates the air cell from the chick). This is called internal pipping. At this time you might hear them cheeping away. After that, the chick will make a small hole in the outside of the egg. This hole is called the external pip. Many chicks take a long break at this point, so don’t worry if the egg stops rocking, chirping and/or progressing.

Once its dozed a bit, the chick will start to unzip the egg. Moving in a circle they will create a little line in the egg until enough has separated that they can push themselves out. Then you are blessed with a hideously ugly wet and nearly bald chick. Not what you were expecting? That’s okay! In an hour or two it will be the cute fluffy chick you’ve been imagining.

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It's the day you've been counting down to. But do chicks really hatch on day 21? Find out what to expect when hatch day arrives and what may have gone wrong when not all the chicks make it.

Removing Hatched Chicks

Some words of wisdom: Do not open the incubator to remove chicks unless you are dealing with one of two things. Either all of the chicks have hatched and are fluffy or it has been 48 hours since the first chick hatched. In that case, grab out all that are dry and fluffy and then close the lid quickly. If an unhatched egg has pipped internally it can get trapped due to the decrease of humidity (which happens quickly).

Intervening in a Hatch

If you feel you must intervene at some point in the hatching process, please read this very helpful post from Backyard Chickens. The author not only tells you when to assist and when to wait, but she has a great guide on how to assist and give your chick the best odds. I recommend reading before starting a hatch so you are prepared for the worst-case-scenario. Please be forewarned that some photos may be hard for some to see and she doesn’t sugar coat.

It's the day you've been counting down to. But do chicks really hatch on day 21? Find out what to expect when hatch day arrives and what may have gone wrong when not all the chicks make it.

Why Some Eggs Don’t Hatch

Even with the best of care, some chicks just don’t make it. It’s a sad thing, but knowing what happened and why it may happen can at least make a loss into a learning experience. Here are a few things that may happen during incubation (as well as ways to prevent them):

Clear/Infertile Eggs

Caused by a variety of things including unhealthy males or females, seasonal fertility decline, eggs damaged by the environment (too hot or too cold) and incorrectly stored eggs.

To avoid clear/infertile eggs, make sure your breeders are healthy with a balanced diet, use younger cockerels, collect eggs frequently and be sure to store eggs at 50-60°F and 60% relative humidity for no more than 7 days.

You may also enjoy  Your Guide to Candling Hatching Eggs

Blood Rings (bacteria inside the egg)

Caused by improper storage, improper incubator temperatures and unclean storage, handling and incubating.

To avoid blood rings, do not attempt to hatch very dirty eggs, check your incubator temperatures and run a test run for several days before setting eggs and make sure that all things the eggs come into contact with are clean.

It's the day you've been counting down to. But do chicks really hatch on day 21? Find out what to expect when hatch day arrives and what may have gone wrong when not all the chicks make it.

Early Quitters (chicks lost in the first week)

Caused by improper incubator temperatures (usually too high), not turning the eggs, poor ventilation or disease in the flock.

To avoid having early losses, again, do a test run so you know your incubator is running at the proper temperature, turn eggs at least 3 or 5 times a day (always in odd numbers), make sure that you have proper ventilation while avoiding drafts and always hatch eggs from a healthy flock.

Pipped Without Hatching

Caused by low humidity, lack of ventilation or malpositioned chicks. To avoid chicks getting stuck in the egg, make sure your humidity levels are around 40-45% for the first 18 days and 60-65% during lockdown (unless you are doing a dry hatch), make sure there is adequate air flow in the incubator and be sure to turn eggs up until lockdown and then hands off.

Not all losses are from human error. Sometimes you can do everything right and still have losses. Rarely do people get 100% hatch rates. We had one infertile egg, one blood ring, two early quitters and one chick we lost at hatch. I consider the thirteen out of eighteen a successful hatch.

You may also enjoy  How to Safely Clip Chicken Wings

Need some help raising those fluffy chicks?  Check out these guides by friends of mine:

Happy hatching everyone!  And if you have cute chick pics, I’d love to see them on our Facebook Page.

It's the day you've been counting down to. But do chicks really hatch on day 21? Find out what to expect when hatch day arrives and what may have gone wrong when not all the chicks make it.

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I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

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About Jessica Lane

I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

Comments

Hatching Chicken Eggs: Day 21 — 5 Comments

  1. Oh boy, am I ever jealous. We live on an old farm where they had an egg and milk business. We have a huge chicken coop and brooder house. Lovely buildings. The people voted to become a city, and now the city fathers won’t let anyone have chickens.Other small towns nearby allow chickens. Not ours.

    Give those babies a hug from me, Jessica. I do love the names you pick.

    • Many people are working hard at overturning these ordinances. Often with a little homework and a chat at a town meeting you can get a few hens allowed. If this is something you are passionate about, feel free to send me an email and I’ll do anything I can to help.

    • While it is definitely an adventure (and some days you think you’ve lost your mind) it’s a rewarding adventure. The fresh eggs, the constant antics and everyone running to you when you walk in the yard makes it all worth it.

  2. Oh they are just precious!! Have fun naming them 🙂 I love how you describe them as ‘unzipping’ their eggs. Makes me imagine they are coming out of a sleeping bag.

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