Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditEmail to someone

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is a member of the mint family and you’ll want to make room for it in your herb garden this year. Don’t worry, although it is related to mint, and it does spread, it spreads at a much slower rate than the mints you might be familiar with. The first year you plant, it will look like a frilly clump, but as it gets older, it will form a nice rounded bush about 2′ tall. I plant it as a landscaping plant, with its violet blue spikes of flowers, because I enjoy its beauty as well as its culinary and medicinal uses. The local pollinators enjoy it as much as I do. Even the hummingbirds stop by to admire it.

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is a member of the mint family and you'll want to make room for it in your herb garden this year.

Hyssop vs. Anise

There is a lot of confusion surrounding the differences between true hyssop and anise hyssop. Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) and true hyssop flowers appear similar and even taste similar, but they come from different roots. Hyssop comes from Europe. Anise is native to North America and tends to be more drought resistant. The real reason to assure that your hyssop is true hyssop is that it has medicinal benefits that anise does not.

| You May Also Enjoy Make Way for Sage {The Culinary & Medicinal Herb} |

Medicinal Uses

Hyssop is often times uses as a cough and cold remedy, usually in the form of a tea. It loosens mucus, aids in congestion, and lessens the symptoms colds, flu, sinus infections, and bronchitis.

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is a member of the mint family and you'll want to make room for it in your herb garden this year.

Left: Hyssopus officinalis ; Right: Agastache foeniculum

Culinary Uses

The flavors are hard to describe. It’s a somewhat bitter, minty-liquorice flavor. It’s used to flavor the popular liqueur, Absinthe. The leaves add a nice minty note to marinades (use sparingly) and the flowers are a nice decorative and refreshing element to salads.

You may also enjoy  Turn Junk Into an Egg Incubator

Growing Hyssop in Your Garden

Hyssop is very easy to grow. In the northern US and southern Canada, it can be found growing along the side of the road. It’s hardy in zone 3-10. It can easily be started from seed indoors, but if you can find an established plant, you can to divide the root ball to start new clumps. To start collect seeds from an established plant, let the flowers dry and then “paper bag” them in the fall.

Plant in full sun with a 18-24″ spacing. If you want a bushier plant, in the spring, prune heavily to encourage new growth.

Cough & Congestion Tea

Feel a cold coming on? Try this recipe.

  • 1 tbsp. dried hyssop flowers or 3 tbsp. of fresh
  • 8 oz. water
  • 1 tbsp. honey
  • 1 tsp. lemon

Steep flowers in boiling water in a covered container for ten minutes. Add lemon (optional) and honey. Honey can be adjusted for optimal sweetness.

For additional cold and flu remedies you can make at home, check out How to Make Elderberry Syrup and Homemade Fire Cider. You may also find relief with 3 Hot Drinks & Teas That Help You Detox

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is a member of the mint family and you'll want to make room for it in your herb garden this year.

Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditEmail to someone
The following two tabs change content below.
I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

Latest posts by Jessica Lane (see all)

Posted in Gardening & Outdoors Tagged , permalink

About Jessica Lane

I am a non-traditional homesteader. What is a non-traditional homesteader? I'd like to think we are the people who don't fit the mold. I am a busy mom on a small bit of property with not a lot of financial resources, but I am figuring out how to live the life I want. A homesteader's life.

Comments

— 18 Comments

  1. I grow hyssop in my garden and I love the fragrance. Sometimes when I want to freshen the air in my kitchen, I pour some boiling water over a few fresh hyssop sprigs in a bowl, and it smells so lovely and fresh. I originally planted it because I had heard the flowers and leaves have wound healing properties, so I wanted to include it in my homemade healing salve (which I did do, but haven’t had a chance to test it yet).

  2. Hyssop is also has a wonderful fragrance that will envelope your garden! It’s lovely, and grows quite tall. So planting it behind shorter plants would be best!

  3. I am a little confused… first it says to get the true variety for medicinal uses and then says to gather seeds from wild plants. wouldn’t the wild seeds be the non-medicinal N. American variety? so, if i want the med. kind, i would not gather seeds and only buy the ones from Europe in a seed catalog. right?

    • When I said “true” I meant hyssop and not anise. Both can be found wild throughout North America. Just make sure you are checking those leaves and blossoms before harvesting.

  4. where might I purchase a Hyssop plant. Have inquired at several nurseries within a 50 mile radius of my residence. The keepers of the nurseries give me the look of sure thing lady. Lost your mind…

      • I found a place called “Grower’s Exchange” and they offer herbal and medicinal plants; there are plenty of online places that sell seeds, but I’d prefer the jump start of already established plants. Most of their plants start at $5.95, some a few dollars more. Just search the name: The Growers Exchange. Photos of the plants, too. A great place to look for those “hard to find” herbal and medicinal plants. Hope this helps you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.