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“Homesteading is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. It is characterized by subsistence agriculture, home preservation of foodstuffs, and it may or may not also involve the small-scale production of textiles, clothing, and craft work for the household use. Homesteading is not defined by where someone lives, such as the city or the country, but by the lifestyle choices they make.”

From my favorite homesteading book,
Homegrown & Homemade

What to Do When Ants Take Over {Naturally}

I really, really don’t like ants. That being said, as a lover of bees and other beneficial insects, I am always incredibly reluctant to use pesticides.

I really, really, really don’t like ants. I saw Legion of Fire: Killer Ants! when I was fourteen and I’ve been terrified of the swarmy little creatures ever since. This aversion has led me to become unusually militant when they attempt to take up residence in my kitchen every summer. I tend to get a little…rampage-y.

That being said, as a lover of bees and other beneficial insects, I am always incredibly reluctant to use pesticides. I would sooner take a flamethrower to my kitchen than coat my baseboards with Raid.

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The Top 37 Homesteading Articles of 2014

Browse through the list, pin your favorites, and let me know which homesteading article of 2014 is your absolute favorite.

Whether you are a backyard hobby homesteader or an avid homesteader on your journey to live off-grid, these are the articles you want to be reading. I searched high a low to compile the best of the best for you. Why 37? Well, I just don’t know. Browse through the list and let me know which article of 2014 is your favorite.

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Suppressing Lactation with Cabbage Leaves

Just another new-age hippie thing? Ask your grandmother what was recommended to her. Cabbage leaves have been used for suppressing lactation for eons.

You go through nine (actually ten) months of pregnancy thinking that delivery is the end of the abuse for your body. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s not. If you decide to breastfeed, you’ve got the discomfort of learning to nurse your baby. If you choose not to breastfeed, you’ve got to go through the painful process of suppressing lactation.

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homemade-tortillas

These homemade tortillas are so easy to make, you’ll wonder why you’ve been wasting time and money going to the store. Sure to be a family favorite.

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What Is My Quail Doing???

Many things the quail do will scare the bejeezus out of you when they first do it. That's why I felt it was my duty to give you a heads up with these funny facts about quail.

Keeping quail is an experience that I believe every homesteader should enjoy. If it’s not for all these reasons, or even these delicious quail egg recipes, it’s because they are so darn funny. I did a lot of research before I got Coturnix quail. I knew how many females I needed for each male. I knew how to incubate them and brood them. I had the right setup prepared and the right foods on hand. I thought I was ready. That was before they arrived. Many things the quail do will scare the bejeezus out of you when they first do it. That’s why I felt it was my duty to give you a heads up with these funny facts about quail.

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Angoras: A Dual Purpose Rabbit

Our French Angoras are the perfect example of a double duty animal. We use our angoras for compost and fiber for crocheting and for other yarn crafts.

In all of our 4H and homesteading days, we have raised over 20 rabbits. Most were “dual duty” as pets and working animals, meaning for compost and fiber. Our French Angoras are the perfect example of a double duty animal. They have lots of long hair that is great for learning how to spin and knit or crochet with. This is the main reason we started our Angora herd, to be honest. My daughter loves to knit, crochet, and all things yarn related. Taking care of the fiber rabbits requires a bit more than just regular rabbits, however.

Our French Angoras are the perfect example of a double duty animal.

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